EVENT CALENDAR

Orange series 8 / Juventus senectutis 8

Slovenska filharmonija / en

25.

May

Orange series 8 / Juventus senectutis 8

Orange series 8 / Juventus senectutis 8

Slovenska filharmonija / en

26.

May

Orange series 8 / Juventus senectutis 8

Blue series 8 / Stravaganze 8

Slovenska filharmonija / en

01.

Jun

Blue series 8 / Stravaganze 8

Blue Series 8 / Stravaganze 8

Slovenska filharmonija / en

02.

Jun

Blue Series 8 / Stravaganze 8

Blue Subscription 7, May 11 and 12, 2017

Orange Series 6 (March 23 and 24, 2017)

Uroš Krek (1922-2008), an honorary member of Slovene Philharmonic and professor emeritus of the Ljubljana University, wrote Two Episodes from Joseph Haydn's Diary near the end of his oeuvre. We shall listen to the first one, dating from 1996, while the other – Thus Passes Day After Day – for chamber orchestra and tenor, was written one year later. With this reworking of Haydn, Krek delved twice as deep into musical history as will the conductor Uroš Lajovic with Dvořak's Cello Concerto from the years 1894-95 and Mahler's unfinished Tenth from 1910-11.Mahler's final years have been documented with morbid precision: everything is thoroughly described, from the tragic death of his first-born child Anne-Marie on vacation at a Carinthian lake, his (more or less forced) departure from the Vienna Court Opera, and falling ill with fatal bacterial myocarditis, all occurring in only a few weeks’ time during the middle of 1907. In the remaining four years he travelled a few times as celebrated composer-conductor to the United States, wrote two symphonies (plus practically the whole Tenth and half of its orchestration) and, with the help of another famous Viennese, Sigmund Freud, addressed his wife's affair with a much younger man. We probably know a bit more than appropriate about all these details. Yet, this gives his music an extra dimension, not an artistic one, but Mahler himself was never one to shy from using emotional tools. During their courtship, for example, he sent Alma the just-composed Adagietto from the Fifth Symphony, together with a direct declaration of his love in a wonderfully simple six-line poem.In these final years it was clear to Mahler that his place in the history of music was assured, yet he had to live with the “Titanic” insight that this couldn't bring any solace to his hurting soul. He also knew that his days were numbered, so both his Ninth and Das Lied von der Erde are pervaded with imminent presence of the approaching farewell.All this intertwined into the final climax while composing the Tenth. Consultation with Freud in the summer of 1910 was followed by triumphant premiere of the Eighth in Munich, then his last travel to America, and the raising awareness that the clock is really ticking. The Tenth is the most intimate of all his symphonic works; Mahler doesn't strive any more that “a symphony must be like the world – it must contain everything,”, as he had famously told Sibelius, now he is simultaneously closing chapters on himself, his wife and his art. The first movement is the only one completed by Mahler, orchestration included – is in recognizable idiom of his last three symphonies, yet ear-and-mind shattering in the famous “cry”, the dissonant trumpet solo, cutting through nine bars of meditative orchestral elegy. This brutal gesture was described by conductor Daniel Harding as “pure musical Edvard Munch”.Compared with these deeply intimate details, Dvořák's Cello Concerto is almost light and entertaining – and yet the slow passage immediately before the final crescendo hides a personal drama, too. While he was finishing this concerto, the composer’s wife's sister was take ill with a deadly disease – and this was the first of two sisters to earn Dvořák's affections before he married the other, just like Mozart and the Weber sisters. Photos: Darja Stravs Tisu

Blue Series 6 (March 30 and 31, 2017)

Puccini’s opera Turandot and especially the ubiquitous aria Nessun dorma were so popular for the last couple of decades that we lose from sight the fact how omnipresent the story of a vengeful princess has been since mid-18th century when it was staged for the first time by Venetian playwright Carlo Gozzi. He found it in a collection of Persian stories Thousand and One day, compiled by French orientalist and diplomat François Pétis de la Croix following the model of Thousand and One Night.The story travelled from Venice to Germany where it was rewritten by Schiller and staged by Goethe in Weimar. Their version influenced Mozart’s nephew von Weber, and also found its way back to Italy and one of early Verdi’s libretist Andrea Maffei. Second half of the 19th century was less interested in costume plays, but the princess came back with a vengence again in early 20th when it attracted so important theatre directors as Max Reinhardt, Gordon Craig and even Soviet Yevgeni Vakhtangov.Before Puccini another Italian composer tried his hand with Turandot: Ferruccio Busoni wrote incidental music and reworked it in a suite, and then finally Puccini came along.  He, like all his predecessors, worked mostly with Schiller’s material, apart from adding three comical court officials Ping, Pong and Pang who were modeled after Gozzi in the commedia dell’ arte manner, turning into creepy enforcers at the opera’s climax.In mid-century again two Germans handled the story, Bertolt Brecht who reworked it according to his principles of political theatre, and Paul Hindemith, who delved into it only partially, as apart from Turandot in his Metamorphosen he also used other Weber material. But the princess definitely enjoyed and still does a pan-European adulation, worthy of an analyst’s couch.And what does such a serious composer like Brahms, who even rejected programme music, have to do with this international costume “ping-pong”? Well, the same as Goethe and Mozart: namely, fascination with Italy which he visited no fewer than nine times. The first of these visits occured in 1878 when he started work on this concerto – and we shouldn’t miss this non-musical trivia: no other expression mark is used more often in the score than “dolce”. Photos: Darja Stravs Tisu

Vocal Series 7 (April 9, 2017)

The seventh concert promises a special musical experience especially for those Vocal Series listeners who may not feel particularly addressed by the music, composed after World War I, as this event will be all about the 17th century music. Guest musicians, led by world famous Argentinian violinist Manfred Kraemer, will perform a pre-Easter programme beginning with Kamnik born Viennese composer Joannes Baptista Dolar (Janez Krstnik Dolar in Slovene) and followed by his contemporaries at the Habsburg court Johann Heinrich Schmelzer and Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber (also a violin virtuoso).Playing “old music” requires special performers’ approach as conditions of its composition and original performances before 19th century were fundamentally different from those in the “century of the bourgeois and revolutions” and later. Specialized ensembles for older periods are very few in Slovenia, as well as  authentic performances, with exceptions of festivals Seviqc Brežice and Radovljica.This makes the guest appearance of a Slovene ensemble musica cubicularis all the more special. It was founded in 2004 as a trio, and eventually grew into a dynamic group of flexible size and cast. It has played with Slovene and international singers, strings and winds players, lutists, harpists, harpsichord players, trombonists, pianists, actors, dancers and jazz saxophone player Vasko Atanasovski. The ensemble plays music from the renaissance up to the 18th century Classical period, playing period instruments and often presenting less known and even unpublished works. musica cubicularis has toured successfully and also made several well received recordings.Let some reviewers speak for themselves:“musica cubicularis is meticulous in search for historical authenticity and stylistic accuracy (...) They convince with technical and stylistic assuredness that infuses their music-making with exceptional credibility.” (Tomaž Gržeta, 2014)“We have experienced lively, high quality performances of older Slovene music, this time played by musica cubicularis with enlarged cast.” (Mihael Kozjek, 2013)The concert is also part of the series HARMONIA CONCERTANS – Old Music at the New Square, into its seventh year of joint management by Domen Marinčič and Tomaž Sevšek with Musicological Institute at the Research Centre of Slovene Academy of the Arts and Sciences (ZRC SAZU).All aficionados of period music making – heartily welcome! Photos: Darja Stravs TisuSlovenska filharmonija, Dvorana Marjana KozineAnsambel musica cubicularis:sopran María Cristina Kiehrtenor Daniel Auchinclosstenor Manuel Warwitzbas Ulrich Messthalerviolina in glasbeno vodstvo Manfredo Kraemerviolina Guadalupe del Moralviola Zsuzsanna Czentnáviola da gamba Christoph Urbanetzviolon Domen Marinčičorgan Tomaž Sevšek

Cycle: The View Forward – The View Back (Janez Matičič), April 21, 2017

Slovenian Philhamronic Orchestra, TaeJung Lee (conductor), Nina Prešiček (piano), programme: Claude Debussy, Janez Matičič, Maurice Ravel

CYCLE TASF – Slovenian Philharmonic Brass Ensemble (May 16, 2017)

PROGRAMME:   Johann Sebastian Bach / Lars Karlin: TOCCATA IN D-MINOR, Lojze Lebič: INTRADA, Johann Sebastian Bach /  Christopher Mowat: BRANDENBURG CONCERTO NO. 3, Jean François Michel: EASTWIND (Tibor Kerekes, solo trumpet, Žan Tkalec, solo trombone), Jim Parker: A LONDONER IN NEW YORK, Domen Jeraša: ZOCF POLKA (Domen Jeraša, solo trombone), Tomaž Habe: TRISTE     SLOVENIAN PHILHARMONIC BRASS ENSEMBLE  TRUMPETS Tibor KerekesFranc KosemBlaž Avbar, guestDejan Glamočak HORNS Maja Burger ZgoncJože Rošer TROMBONESDomen JerašaŽan TkalecWolf Hagen Hoyer  TUBA Janez Žnidaršič PERCUSSION Matevž Bajde

4th Slowind Spring, May 8 and 9, 2017

www.slowind.eu

Orange Series 6 (March 23 and 24, 2017)

Orange Series 7

slovenska.filharmonija.en

3D house tour of Slovenian Philharmonic

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Slovenska filharmonija / en

pred 5 dnevi
Season Bookings, from June 19 till June 30, 2017
June 19-June 30, 2017
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pred 5 dnevi
Blue Series 8, June 1 and 2, 2017 at 7.30
The series on extravagancies is to end on sunny pre-summer note with two sets of Paganini variations and an explosion of ...
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pred 5 dnevi
Orange series 8, May 25 and 26, 2017 at 7.30
The unfinished Bruckner’s Ninth is just perfect for the conclusion of the cycle on “the youth of old ...
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May 04, 2017
4th Slowind Spring, May 8 and 9, 2017
www.slowind.eu
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Apr 25, 2017
The Slovenian Philharmonic Building
The site of today’s beautiful Slovenian Philharmonic building was for decades dominated by the old ...
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Apr 25, 2017
Tomorrow
The Slovenian Philharmonic is entering the new era with large-scale plans and ambitious ideas. The old building on ...
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Apr 25, 2017
The new Slovenian Philharmonic (1947)
After the War was won in 1945, the situation changed in the field of music. New cultural institutions necessary for the ...
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Apr 25, 2017
The inter-war years and the Second World War ...
The end of the First World War marked the beginning of a national state for the Slovenian nation: the state of ...
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Apr 25, 2017
The Philharmonic society (1794)
On the territory of present day Slovenia, and particularly within the circle of intellectuals that formed around Baron ...
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Apr 25, 2017
Academia Philharmonicorum (1701)
Towards the end of 1701, a group of like-minded men gathered at the home of patrician Janez Bertold von Höffer and ...
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Apr 25, 2017
Cycle: The View Forward – The View Back (Janez ...
Slovenian Philhamronic Orchestra, TaeJung Lee (conductor), Nina Prešiček (piano), ...
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Apr 25, 2017
Vocal Series 7 (April 9, 2017)
The seventh concert promises a special musical experience especially for those Vocal Series listeners who may not feel ...
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